MACROLICHENS

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Hello, Rose here!

Like your lichens? When I arrived at SFI, I knew zilch about lichens. Before I left SFI, I learned how important lichens are to the ecosystems surrounding us.

Lichens absorb and retain pollutants, providing us with a way to measure stored chemicals and air quality. These pollutants are absorbed through lichens’ surfaces, which are called cortexes. Something else to consider: lichens provide food for large animals and small animals and shelter for tiny creatures, including insects. Within our ecosystems, lichens are telling us a story. We should listen!

 

“Introduction to Lichens” in April 2018 was well balanced with classroom education plus labs, along with field experiences. The basic chemistry needed to test and identify lichens was explained in an easy-to-understand way.

I have take several classes at SFI; they always find a way to accommodate all students. Discovering lichens was an all-around good experience.

“If you don’t know, you will learn.
If you do know, you will learn more.”

Rose Kilpatrick

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Rose Kilpatrick

 

 

Gifts of the Wild

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Botanizing Whetstone Butte with botanist Cecile Shohet was my first class at the Siskiyou Field Institute.  She was assisted by special guest field guide, geologist John Roth, who held the back end of our hefty class of 25 along the single trails. Though we had two expert leaders, I was also impressed by how much … Read more

Roberta the Hairworm

By Kathy Mechling, M.D., SFI Board President We were peering into the old horse trough to see how the tadpoles were progressing.  We saw no tads, they had probably metamorphosed and jumped out, but there was a lovely sinuous worm.  She was very thin, like spaghettini, tan colored; about 8 inches long with no obvious … Read more